THECOOLTUREOFFICIAL
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art21:

“Making these large works, what concerns me the most is how to get you to pay attention to weight and volume and space and interiors and exteriors. I want to make something that seems really improbable.” —Diana Al-Hadid
New film from the New York Close Up series: Artist Diana Al-Hadid creates sculptures and drawings that embrace illusionism and the unknown, culminating in the exhibition The Vanishing Point (2012) at Marianne Boesky Gallery in New York.
Shown here are the works “Suspended After Image” (2012), “At the Vanishing Point” (2012), “Untitled” (2012), “Divided Line” (2012), and “Antonym” (2012), all installed at Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, in late 2012.
WATCH: Diana Al-Hadid’s Suspended Reality
art21:

“Making these large works, what concerns me the most is how to get you to pay attention to weight and volume and space and interiors and exteriors. I want to make something that seems really improbable.” —Diana Al-Hadid
New film from the New York Close Up series: Artist Diana Al-Hadid creates sculptures and drawings that embrace illusionism and the unknown, culminating in the exhibition The Vanishing Point (2012) at Marianne Boesky Gallery in New York.
Shown here are the works “Suspended After Image” (2012), “At the Vanishing Point” (2012), “Untitled” (2012), “Divided Line” (2012), and “Antonym” (2012), all installed at Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, in late 2012.
WATCH: Diana Al-Hadid’s Suspended Reality
art21:

“Making these large works, what concerns me the most is how to get you to pay attention to weight and volume and space and interiors and exteriors. I want to make something that seems really improbable.” —Diana Al-Hadid
New film from the New York Close Up series: Artist Diana Al-Hadid creates sculptures and drawings that embrace illusionism and the unknown, culminating in the exhibition The Vanishing Point (2012) at Marianne Boesky Gallery in New York.
Shown here are the works “Suspended After Image” (2012), “At the Vanishing Point” (2012), “Untitled” (2012), “Divided Line” (2012), and “Antonym” (2012), all installed at Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, in late 2012.
WATCH: Diana Al-Hadid’s Suspended Reality
art21:

“Making these large works, what concerns me the most is how to get you to pay attention to weight and volume and space and interiors and exteriors. I want to make something that seems really improbable.” —Diana Al-Hadid
New film from the New York Close Up series: Artist Diana Al-Hadid creates sculptures and drawings that embrace illusionism and the unknown, culminating in the exhibition The Vanishing Point (2012) at Marianne Boesky Gallery in New York.
Shown here are the works “Suspended After Image” (2012), “At the Vanishing Point” (2012), “Untitled” (2012), “Divided Line” (2012), and “Antonym” (2012), all installed at Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, in late 2012.
WATCH: Diana Al-Hadid’s Suspended Reality
art21:

“Making these large works, what concerns me the most is how to get you to pay attention to weight and volume and space and interiors and exteriors. I want to make something that seems really improbable.” —Diana Al-Hadid
New film from the New York Close Up series: Artist Diana Al-Hadid creates sculptures and drawings that embrace illusionism and the unknown, culminating in the exhibition The Vanishing Point (2012) at Marianne Boesky Gallery in New York.
Shown here are the works “Suspended After Image” (2012), “At the Vanishing Point” (2012), “Untitled” (2012), “Divided Line” (2012), and “Antonym” (2012), all installed at Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, in late 2012.
WATCH: Diana Al-Hadid’s Suspended Reality
art21:

“Making these large works, what concerns me the most is how to get you to pay attention to weight and volume and space and interiors and exteriors. I want to make something that seems really improbable.” —Diana Al-Hadid
New film from the New York Close Up series: Artist Diana Al-Hadid creates sculptures and drawings that embrace illusionism and the unknown, culminating in the exhibition The Vanishing Point (2012) at Marianne Boesky Gallery in New York.
Shown here are the works “Suspended After Image” (2012), “At the Vanishing Point” (2012), “Untitled” (2012), “Divided Line” (2012), and “Antonym” (2012), all installed at Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, in late 2012.
WATCH: Diana Al-Hadid’s Suspended Reality
art21:

“Making these large works, what concerns me the most is how to get you to pay attention to weight and volume and space and interiors and exteriors. I want to make something that seems really improbable.” —Diana Al-Hadid
New film from the New York Close Up series: Artist Diana Al-Hadid creates sculptures and drawings that embrace illusionism and the unknown, culminating in the exhibition The Vanishing Point (2012) at Marianne Boesky Gallery in New York.
Shown here are the works “Suspended After Image” (2012), “At the Vanishing Point” (2012), “Untitled” (2012), “Divided Line” (2012), and “Antonym” (2012), all installed at Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, in late 2012.
WATCH: Diana Al-Hadid’s Suspended Reality
art21:

“Making these large works, what concerns me the most is how to get you to pay attention to weight and volume and space and interiors and exteriors. I want to make something that seems really improbable.” —Diana Al-Hadid
New film from the New York Close Up series: Artist Diana Al-Hadid creates sculptures and drawings that embrace illusionism and the unknown, culminating in the exhibition The Vanishing Point (2012) at Marianne Boesky Gallery in New York.
Shown here are the works “Suspended After Image” (2012), “At the Vanishing Point” (2012), “Untitled” (2012), “Divided Line” (2012), and “Antonym” (2012), all installed at Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, in late 2012.
WATCH: Diana Al-Hadid’s Suspended Reality
art21:

“Making these large works, what concerns me the most is how to get you to pay attention to weight and volume and space and interiors and exteriors. I want to make something that seems really improbable.” —Diana Al-Hadid
New film from the New York Close Up series: Artist Diana Al-Hadid creates sculptures and drawings that embrace illusionism and the unknown, culminating in the exhibition The Vanishing Point (2012) at Marianne Boesky Gallery in New York.
Shown here are the works “Suspended After Image” (2012), “At the Vanishing Point” (2012), “Untitled” (2012), “Divided Line” (2012), and “Antonym” (2012), all installed at Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, in late 2012.
WATCH: Diana Al-Hadid’s Suspended Reality
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nycartscene:

continues thru May 4: “Reflecting Pool” Portia MunsonP•P•O•W, 535 W22nd St., NYC (3rd Fl)Munson continues to employ photography, sculpture and installation to form interconnected works that examine the relationship of the natural to the artificial. Munson’s work is a record of this moment in time as she observes the changes to her local environment and the impact that cars, roads and buildings have on natural places and wildlife.
nycartscene:

continues thru May 4: “Reflecting Pool” Portia MunsonP•P•O•W, 535 W22nd St., NYC (3rd Fl)Munson continues to employ photography, sculpture and installation to form interconnected works that examine the relationship of the natural to the artificial. Munson’s work is a record of this moment in time as she observes the changes to her local environment and the impact that cars, roads and buildings have on natural places and wildlife.
nycartscene:

continues thru May 4: “Reflecting Pool” Portia MunsonP•P•O•W, 535 W22nd St., NYC (3rd Fl)Munson continues to employ photography, sculpture and installation to form interconnected works that examine the relationship of the natural to the artificial. Munson’s work is a record of this moment in time as she observes the changes to her local environment and the impact that cars, roads and buildings have on natural places and wildlife.
nycartscene:

continues thru May 4: “Reflecting Pool” Portia MunsonP•P•O•W, 535 W22nd St., NYC (3rd Fl)Munson continues to employ photography, sculpture and installation to form interconnected works that examine the relationship of the natural to the artificial. Munson’s work is a record of this moment in time as she observes the changes to her local environment and the impact that cars, roads and buildings have on natural places and wildlife.
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herrrohde:

cool style
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magnumnonnenmacher:

Sight model RJ Rogenski for spring season for the latest issue of GQ Spain. Photographer Gonzalo Machado .
magnumnonnenmacher:

Sight model RJ Rogenski for spring season for the latest issue of GQ Spain. Photographer Gonzalo Machado .
magnumnonnenmacher:

Sight model RJ Rogenski for spring season for the latest issue of GQ Spain. Photographer Gonzalo Machado .
magnumnonnenmacher:

Sight model RJ Rogenski for spring season for the latest issue of GQ Spain. Photographer Gonzalo Machado .
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bombayelectric:

Bling Bling!
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musesofdesign:

(via TheDesignerPad - The Designer Pad - A DELIGHTFUL MIX OF STYLES)
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officialrodarte:

Miroslava Duma wears Rodarte’s SS13 Dress and Top in the April 2013 issue of Vogue; styled by Sara Moonves (photo by Mikael Jansson).
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architizer:

Check out this Ukrainian Teen’s Stunt Photography!
architizer:

Check out this Ukrainian Teen’s Stunt Photography!
architizer:

Check out this Ukrainian Teen’s Stunt Photography!
architizer:

Check out this Ukrainian Teen’s Stunt Photography!
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maisonmartinmargiela:

Discover the suits from the Maison Martin Margiela Spring-Summer 2013 Menswear Défilé Collection, reinterpreted in soft and comfortable fabrics.
Now available on our e-boutique.
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storyboard:

At Gowanus Canal, Turning Toxic Waste Into Art
New York’s Gowanus Canal is notoriously toxic — full of dangerous chemicals, industrial waste, and yes, poop. It reeks in the summer and lives in the popular imagination as the perfect dumping ground for dead bodies. No plant or animal life can survive in it for long. This tends to inspire two kinds of images: gritty photos of the filth and pollution, and scenic landscapes that try not to dwell too long on the former.
Read More
storyboard:

At Gowanus Canal, Turning Toxic Waste Into Art
New York’s Gowanus Canal is notoriously toxic — full of dangerous chemicals, industrial waste, and yes, poop. It reeks in the summer and lives in the popular imagination as the perfect dumping ground for dead bodies. No plant or animal life can survive in it for long. This tends to inspire two kinds of images: gritty photos of the filth and pollution, and scenic landscapes that try not to dwell too long on the former.
Read More
storyboard:

At Gowanus Canal, Turning Toxic Waste Into Art
New York’s Gowanus Canal is notoriously toxic — full of dangerous chemicals, industrial waste, and yes, poop. It reeks in the summer and lives in the popular imagination as the perfect dumping ground for dead bodies. No plant or animal life can survive in it for long. This tends to inspire two kinds of images: gritty photos of the filth and pollution, and scenic landscapes that try not to dwell too long on the former.
Read More
storyboard:

At Gowanus Canal, Turning Toxic Waste Into Art
New York’s Gowanus Canal is notoriously toxic — full of dangerous chemicals, industrial waste, and yes, poop. It reeks in the summer and lives in the popular imagination as the perfect dumping ground for dead bodies. No plant or animal life can survive in it for long. This tends to inspire two kinds of images: gritty photos of the filth and pollution, and scenic landscapes that try not to dwell too long on the former.
Read More
storyboard:

At Gowanus Canal, Turning Toxic Waste Into Art
New York’s Gowanus Canal is notoriously toxic — full of dangerous chemicals, industrial waste, and yes, poop. It reeks in the summer and lives in the popular imagination as the perfect dumping ground for dead bodies. No plant or animal life can survive in it for long. This tends to inspire two kinds of images: gritty photos of the filth and pollution, and scenic landscapes that try not to dwell too long on the former.
Read More
storyboard:

At Gowanus Canal, Turning Toxic Waste Into Art
New York’s Gowanus Canal is notoriously toxic — full of dangerous chemicals, industrial waste, and yes, poop. It reeks in the summer and lives in the popular imagination as the perfect dumping ground for dead bodies. No plant or animal life can survive in it for long. This tends to inspire two kinds of images: gritty photos of the filth and pollution, and scenic landscapes that try not to dwell too long on the former.
Read More
storyboard:

At Gowanus Canal, Turning Toxic Waste Into Art
New York’s Gowanus Canal is notoriously toxic — full of dangerous chemicals, industrial waste, and yes, poop. It reeks in the summer and lives in the popular imagination as the perfect dumping ground for dead bodies. No plant or animal life can survive in it for long. This tends to inspire two kinds of images: gritty photos of the filth and pollution, and scenic landscapes that try not to dwell too long on the former.
Read More
storyboard:

At Gowanus Canal, Turning Toxic Waste Into Art
New York’s Gowanus Canal is notoriously toxic — full of dangerous chemicals, industrial waste, and yes, poop. It reeks in the summer and lives in the popular imagination as the perfect dumping ground for dead bodies. No plant or animal life can survive in it for long. This tends to inspire two kinds of images: gritty photos of the filth and pollution, and scenic landscapes that try not to dwell too long on the former.
Read More
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storyboard:

Marlo Meekins: Caricature as Character
Marlo Meekins is a legendary creature: the continuously and gainfully employed artist, illustrator, and cartoonist who’s worked on everything you love, but you still somehow haven’t heard of. Unless you’re into illustrators on Tumblr of course, in which case it’s hard to miss her distinctive line.
Hailing from the cluster of suburbs on the New Jersey side of Philadelphia, Meekins wanted to learn animation in college, but settled for illustration and design. That turned out not to be settling at all, as the discipline obviously informs her work and creative life. After school, she went right to regular illustration and character design for the studios, taught drawing and cartooning, and entered the world of competitive caricature. In 2009 she was named Caricaturist of the Year by the International Society of Caricature Artists.
Meekins spent a hot second working on The Simpsons but dropped the gig to join John Kricfalusi at Spumco, where she met her husband, director Nick Cross. Since then, she’s been contracted on all kinds of developing shows (including one for Disney), while still omnivorously teaching, drawing, and posting her work online.

Read More
storyboard:

Marlo Meekins: Caricature as Character
Marlo Meekins is a legendary creature: the continuously and gainfully employed artist, illustrator, and cartoonist who’s worked on everything you love, but you still somehow haven’t heard of. Unless you’re into illustrators on Tumblr of course, in which case it’s hard to miss her distinctive line.
Hailing from the cluster of suburbs on the New Jersey side of Philadelphia, Meekins wanted to learn animation in college, but settled for illustration and design. That turned out not to be settling at all, as the discipline obviously informs her work and creative life. After school, she went right to regular illustration and character design for the studios, taught drawing and cartooning, and entered the world of competitive caricature. In 2009 she was named Caricaturist of the Year by the International Society of Caricature Artists.
Meekins spent a hot second working on The Simpsons but dropped the gig to join John Kricfalusi at Spumco, where she met her husband, director Nick Cross. Since then, she’s been contracted on all kinds of developing shows (including one for Disney), while still omnivorously teaching, drawing, and posting her work online.

Read More
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nicolaformichetti:

Launching my jewelry line with Didier Dubot x Nicopanda tonight in Korea!! #punk #nicopanda